Category Archives: News

Caregiving in the United States 2015 Report

Caregiving in the U.S. 2015 is a joint research study between the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP providing new insights into higher-hour caregivers (at least 21 hours of care a week), caregivers ages 75 and older, multicultural caregivers (including African American/black, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian American/Pacific Islander populations), and the challenges facing caregivers in the workplace.

You can download the report at: caregiving.org/caregiving2015

Caregiving in the U.S. 2015 provides surprising insight into today’s family caregivers. The typical higher-hour caregiver (who provides unpaid care for at least 21 hours a week) has been caregiving for an average of 5-1/2 years and expects to continue care for another 5 years. Nearly half of these higher-hour caregivers report high emotional stress (46 percent).

Also surprising are findings from subpopulations of caregivers. Today, nearly a quarter of America’s caregivers are millennials between the ages of 18 and 34 and are equally likely to be male or female. On the other end of the spectrum, caregivers ages 75 or older are typically the sole support for their loved one, providing care without paid help or help from relatives and friends. Men, a group often stereotyped as failing to take on caregiving responsibilities, currently represent 40 percent of family caregivers and provide an average of 23 hours a week supporting a loved one.

“As previous AARP research has shown, we’re facing a caregiving cliff,” said Dr. Susan Reinhard, senior vice president and director, AARP Public Policy Institute; and chief strategist, Center to Champion Nursing in America. “By mid-century, there will be only three family caregivers available for each person requiring care. That means, to avoid putting them at higher risk as they age, we need to provide support for existing caregivers who are underserved by the current long-term services and support system.”

Caregivers and the White House Conference on Aging

This year’s White House Conference on Aging will be unique. Instead of being shaped by legislation directed by Congress, it has sought broad public engagement. During the past year, issues and ideas important to older Americans have been gathered at listening sessions around the country and through comments submitted on the event website, whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov.

The White House Conference on Aging is eager for individuals to view and participate in its webcast on July 13. Viewers are encouraged to comment and ask questions via Twitter and Facebook.

Caregiving affects all four of the policy areas that will be discussed: Healthy Aging, Long Term Services and Supports, Elder Justice, and Retirement Security. The conference recognizes caregivers’ stress, their need for navigation of services, and the financial hardships they endure.

Organizations and businesses taking new actions around caregiving and other issues of aging are invited to let the White House know at info@whaging.gov.

Policy Briefs can be found at:
http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/issues/index.html

Webcasts of the regional forums held earlier this year are online at:
http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/happening/index.html

Howard Gleckman coverage of the Family Caregiver Platform Project

Forbes’ contributor Howard Gleckman has a good analysis of why the Family Caregiver Platform Project is positioned to make an impact this political season. Here’s a key quote:

There is no shortage of organizations that advocate for older Americans or causes that are important to them. There are disease-oriented groups, trade associations representing senior service providers, and even groups that lobby explicitly on the needs of caregivers.

But these outfits are focused on ongoing political advocacy. Altarum does not lobby and is not pushing a specific agenda. Rather, it has in mind a one-time, grass-roots initiative aimed at achieving a single goal: Getting caregiver issues on the radar in political season.

You can read the full story at Forbes.

Massachusetts House to take up budget fix that could affect seniors

BOSTON — The Massachusetts House will take up Gov. Charlie Baker’s budget reduction bill on Wednesday afternoon.

Baker, a Republican, last week proposed a mix of spending cuts and new revenue to close a mid-year budget gap pegged at $768 million. Most of the new revenues – $179 million – and some of the spending cuts – $103 million – require legislative approval.

Advocates representing seniors and health care workers are worried that proposed changes could lead to reductions in MassHealth benefits.

More: http://www.masslive.com/politics/index.ssf/2015/02/massachusetts_house_to_take_up.html